The Midwestern Spring is a tricky time for people enjoying a well-regulated, indoor climate. April provided plenty of cold nights to keep our heating systems busy, yet we also experienced more than a week of summer-like temperatures to make us turn on the AC for the first time this year. Both heating and cooling requires energy and drives the utility bill, but curious minds may ask: Which of the two require more energy?

The answer depends on a couple of factors like temperature preferences. Most Americans prefer an indoor temperature between 70 and 76 degrees during the warmer times of the year, yet more than a third of households prefer temperatures below 70 or above 77 degrees. You will likely spend a larger chunk of energy on heating if you move from Phoenix to the Midwest and prefer warmer indoor temperatures. The opposite applies when you move from the Quad Cities to Florida and prefer cooler temperatures. There is a definitive answer to the main question, though.

Most Quad Citizens will spend more money on heating than on air conditioning. It takes more energy to maintain 70 degrees during the winter when it is only 30 degrees outside than it takes cooling your home from 90 to 70 degrees. The latter situation only displays a 20-degree adjustment versus the winter’s 40-degree adjustment.

Luckily, furnaces and air conditioners have become more energy efficient through the years, so the average annual energy consumption in the US has been decreasing for decades. Most newer homes also come with better insulation which maintains indoor temperatures longer and many households have adapted to thermostats which adjust temperatures during the day to account for the time when nobody is home. They are especially valuable during the Spring and Fall when heating and cooling needs may vary from day to day.

Even though you will most likely spend more for heating throughout the year, there are plenty of ways to reduce costs. Check out more tips in our “Money Saving Tips” blog section and do not hesitate to give us a call at 309-764-2500 -with any questions.

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.